Section 8 / MSAs – 3. How do the provisions of RESPA Section 8 apply when analyzing whether an MSA is lawful?

Compliance > Regulation X - RESPA
Q:   How do the provisions of RESPA Section 8 apply when analyzing whether an MSA is lawful?
 
A:   Entering into, performing services under, and making payments under MSAs are not, by themselves, prohibited acts under RESPA or Regulation X. In fact, MSAs are not referenced in RESPA or Regulation X. Ultimately, the determination of whether an MSA itself or the payments or conduct under an MSA is lawful depends on whether it violates the prohibitions under RESPA Section 8(a) or RESPA Section 8(b), or is permitted under RESPA Section 8(c). The analysis under RESPA Section 8 depends on the facts and circumstances, including the details of the MSA and how it is both structured and implemented. The following describes how specific provisions of RESPA frame that analysis.
 
Under RESPA Section 8(a), if an MSA involves an agreement or understanding to refer business incident to or part of a settlement service in exchange for a fee, kickback, or thing of value, then the MSA or conduct under the MSA is prohibited. For example, this can include (but is not limited to) agreements structured or implemented to provide payments based on the number of referrals received. For more information about the analysis under RESPA Section 8(a), see RESPA Section 8(a) FAQ 1, above.
 
Under RESPA Section 8(b), if the MSA serves as a method of splitting charges made or received for real estate settlement services in connection with a federally related mortgage loan, other than for services actually performed, the MSA or the conduct under the MSA is prohibited. MSAs violate RESPA Section 8(b) if they disguise kickbacks by purporting to provide payment for services, but a split charge is paid even though the person receiving the split charge does not actually perform services. Similarly, a violation of RESPA Section 8(b) occurs if the services are performed, but the amount of the split charge exceeds the value of the services performed by the person receiving the split. For more information about the analysis under RESPA Section 8(b), see RESPA Section 8 General FAQ 3, above.
 
However, under RESPA Section 8(c)(2), if the MSA or conduct under the MSA reflects an agreement for the payment for bona fide salary or compensation or other payment for goods or facilities actually furnished or for services actually performed, the MSA or the conduct is not prohibited. 12 USC § 2607(c)(2); 12 CFR § 1024.14(g)(1)(iv). RESPA Section 8(c)(2) does not apply to MSAs that involve payments for referrals because they are not agreements for marketing services actually performed. However, RESPA Section 8 does not prohibit payments under MSAs if the purported marketing services are actually provided, and if the payments are reasonably related to the market value of the provided services only. Note that under Regulation X, the value of the referral, i.e., any additional business that might be provided by the referral, cannot be taken into consideration when determining whether the payment has a reasonable relationship to the value of the services provided. 12 CFR § 1024.14(g)(2). See also 12 CFR § 1024.14(b).
 
 
This Q&A was based on information contained in the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s (CFPB) Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act FAQs that were issued in October, 2020, which may be updated from time to time.  This CFPB issuance may be found here:  https://www.consumerfinance.gov/policy-compliance/guidance/mortgage-resources/real-estate-settlement-procedures-act/real-estate-settlement-procedures-act-faqs/#respa-section-8-general
 

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